• How To Eliminate Animal Odor

    Posted on November 12th, 2013
    admin No comments

    We all love our pets but sometimes they come with foul odors we would rather not deal with.

    Our product can help! With our product you can safely and confidently eliminate animal odors no matter how strong they are.

    Cat & dog urine odor is one of the strongest and toughest odors to get rid of. Most products on the market are wet and must come into contact with the urine to remove the odor. This means if you have urine that has soaked into the carpet you must pull up the carpet and pad and soak the carpet, pad and floorboards. What a mess!

    With Clear The Air Cat & Dog Urine Odor Eliminator just sprinkle the granules on top of the carpet leave on overnight and vacuum in the morning and the odor is completely eliminated. Works well on all surfaces pulling the odors out of tile and concrete. Will completely eliminate the odors from your liter box, no one will know you have a liter box in the house!

    Watch our video to learn how to easily eliminate pet odors:

  • 7 Must Know Tips For Bird Owners

    Posted on September 13th, 2013
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    Are you a first time bird owner?

    Even if you’ve had birds all your life, the following tips are helpful to all bird owners:

    • Before bringing your bird home, you will want to make sure you purchase a large well-constructed cage.  No matter the species, it is important for your bird to have enough room to stretch his wings and fly short distances.  Horizontal bars and perches need to also be installed in your cage at varying heights.
    • Line the bottom of the cage with plain paper or paper bags that are cut to size and make sure it is changed daily.  We recommend sprinkling Clear The Air at the bottom of your bird cage to keep odors away.  Place your bird’s cage in a warm, bright part of the house off the floor that is close to where the action is but away from drafts and direct sunlight.  Make sure your bird is not close to the kitchen as they are extremely sensitive to fumes from ovens, cookware and such.
    • When it comes to feeding your bird, pelleted food is the way to go.  While seed mixes provide variety, they do not always provide the best nutrition. Fresh veggies and fruits should be given to your bird every day.  Dark, leafy greens are packed with vitamins and many birds also enjoy carrots and broccoli.  Fresh cold water should also be available at all times and changed at least once a day.
    • A trained and tamed bird will need at least an hour of exercise out of the cage in a safe and enclosed room every day.  He may simply want to just sit on your shoulder or explore the room.  For birds that do not take to handling, providing a selection of toys like ladders, swings and mirrors with bells are a great way to keep your bird entertained.
    • Providing a shallow dish at the bottom of the cage is a great way to provide a bath for your bird and keeping his plumage looking perfect.  It is probably a good idea to schedule a bath right before you plan to clean out the cage.

    Do you have any bird tips you’d like to share? Please comment on our blog.

  • How To Care For Your Bird

    Posted on February 1st, 2013
    admin No comments

    Do you have a bird? The ASPCA has some special tips to caring for your bird by picking out his perfect housing along with a healthy diet.

    Remember to sprinkle Clear the Air’s Odor Eliminator at the bottom of your birds cage to eliminate any odor your bird may cause. It is 100% non- toxic and so safe your bird could eat it.

    Housing For Your Bird: Always buy the largest, most well-constructed cage you can afford. No matter the species, your bird will need a cage that’s large enough for her to stretch her wings and fly short distances. A typical cage for small birds should be about 25 inches tall and 25 inches from front to back. To prevent escape or injury, the bars on the bird cage should only be .4 inches apart—a little larger than the tips of your fingers. Note that canaries and finches prefer a cage that’s wider than it is taller, while parakeets and cockatiels like tall cages with horizontal bars they can climb. And don’t forget perches, please! You’ll need to install several, at varying heights—and do make sure that one is level with the food dishes.

    Line the bottom of the cage with plain paper or paper bags cut to size. Newspaper is fine, as long as it’s been printed with non-toxic, soy-based inks. You’ll need to change the paper daily.

    Where should you set up your bird’s new home? Location is everything. Place the cage in a warm, bright part of the house, close to where the action is but away from all drafts and direct sunlight, and off the floor. Avoid setting up the cage in or near the kitchen at all costs. Birds are extremely sensitive to fumes, and those from self-cleaning ovens and Teflon-coated cookware, if overheated, can be fatal.

    Your Bird’s Diet: Although seed has been the traditional staple of a bird’s diet, most experts recommend pelleted food as the way to go. Seed mixes provide variety, but they do not always provide optimum nutrition, and are definitely on the messy side. We recommend a high-quality pelleted food that’s formulated for your bird’s species.

    Be sure to offer fresh veggies and fruits to your bird every day. Dark, leafy greens are packed with vitamins, and many birds also enjoy carrots and broccoli. Common fruity faves are apples, pears, melon and kiwi. Take care to remove any uneaten food after a couple of hours, and please do not give your bird avocado, cherry pits, rhubarb or apple seeds.

    Fresh, cold water should be available at all times. Change it at least once a day, preferably twice.

  • First Time Bird Owners

    Posted on June 27th, 2012
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    Are you a first time bird owner?

    If you are new to bird ownership check out these helpful tips to ensure your new pet bird enjoys a happy and healthy new home.

    Remember Clear the Air works wonders in your bird cage to eliminate any and all odors.  It is completely non-toxic and safe around childres and pets.  You can hang on of our Odor Eliminator Bags within the bird cage and sprinkle the Pet Odor Eliminator granules at the bottom of the cage.

    Check out our tips:

    • Feeding Your Bird – All seed diets are usually not recommended. Pet parrots crack seeds and eat the inside portion. The hulls often remain in the feeding dish giving the appearance that the bird has plenty of food when in reality there are no seeds left. Replace your bird’s food daily.
    • Your Bird’s Diet – Seeds lack calcium, protein and many other vitamins and minerals which birds require. Seeds and nuts are also high in fat, which can lead to liver disease. While birds do eat seeds in the wild, they supplement their diet with many other food sources – nuts, berries, fruit, bugs, etc. Like humans, birds require a balanced diet to remain healthy. Birds enjoy veggies, fruits, pasta, sprouts, grains and even cooked meat such as chicken. Pellets are also a good source of nutrients. Many experts recommend pellets should be no more than 50% of the diet, while others feed a higher percentage. Seeds and nuts can be given as treats.
    • Toxic Foods – Some foods, safe for humans, are lethal to birds. These include such items as avocados, chocolate, alcohol, caffeine, raw kidney and lima beans, cigarette smoke and pesticides in fruits and vegetables. 
    • Don’t use Grit – Most birds don’t need grit and can even get an impacted crop from it. Grit is only recommended for birds who eat whole seeds – shell and all. Most birds crack their seeds, leaving the hulls and so have no need for the grit.
    • Your Birds Home – Get a cage which gives your bird plenty of room to spread his wings, climb around, jump, swing and play. Be sure bars are not spaced so that a bird can wedge his head between them and get caught. Since birds tend to favor the higher parts of the cage, get one with the largest width and depth you can. Remember, your bird spends many hours in his cage, so the larger the better. Be sure to place cages away from drafty areas or doors to the outside. Temperature should not vary quickly or go below 55 degrees. 
    • Get Your Bird A Perch – Birds spend a lot of time on their perches. They need perches of varying diameters to prevent foot problems such as arthritis and atrophy. Avoid perches made from dowels, which are uniform and don’t exercise feet. Never use sandpaper perches which harm the skin on a bird’s foot. Tree branches are very good for the feet and also help satisfy the chewing urge. A cement perch can help keep nails trimmed. Put a wooden perch high in the cage, which birds prefer. Make sure perches aren’t over bowls or other perches so droppings don’t hit them. Use multiple perches, but leave room for birds to move about in the cage. 
    • Bird Feathers– Feathers grow back. If your bird accidentally loses some feathers, don’t panic. They’ll grow back. Bird also molt. It is their way of replacing worn feathers. Different species molt at different times and lose different amounts of feathers. Feathers grow back usually in 2-3 weeks. However, if you see bare patches of skin, this may denote a disease or feather plucking. In this case see your vet.
    • Bird Veterinarian – Birds are very different than cats and dogs. Find an avian vet, one who knows about birds. Take your bird for a new bird exam to ensure it is healthy and to establish a baseline in case of illness. And develop a relationship with your vet. Find a vet or hospital that you can contact at night or weekends in an emergency. Birds should also have an annual exam to ensure they are healthy. Be sure to keep your vet’s phone number handy in case of emergency.
    • Your Bird Needs Attention – Birds are very intelligent and social animals who require love and attention. Although the amount of attention varies by species, a bird who is ignored or bored can go insane, pluck his feathers or even mutilate himself. Keep your bird in an area where there is family activity, but be sure he has a quiet area to sleep in at night. Talk to your bird during the day. If you work, leave a radio, CD or TV on when you are gone. Take him out for play and cuddling every day. Be sure he has lots of toys and things to play with while in his cage. Give your bird lots of love and it will be returned tenfold.
    • Communication – One of the most important aspects in creating and maintaining a successful relationship with your bird is the ability to understand his vocalizations and body language. Birds learn to communicate with us through sounds, behavior and actions. Using their body language and vocalizations they can “tell” us when they are happy, content, frightened, sick, hungry, tired, angry, or ready to be held and cuddled. It is of utmost importance that bird owners learn to interpret the meanings of their birds sounds and behaviors in order to successfully tame, train, and provide them with the very best of care.
  • Saving On Pet Expenses

    Posted on June 25th, 2012
    admin No comments

    Great article we came across from ABC News about saving money on pet related expenses.  Check it out:

    Caring for a pet can be a big expense, with owners spending between $600 and $3,000 a year depending on the breed and budget.

    Josh Elledge from the Savings Angel.com has some advice to help save on pet-related expenses.

    VETERINARY CARE/MEDICATIONS:

    Veterinary care can be one of the largest expenses with medications for everything from fleas to heartworm to more specific medications for your pet’s ailments. It is possible to purchase medications through online pharmacies and save yourself a good deal of money. While critics may warn about the dangers of buying medications online, this is a particularly important option for families who might not otherwise be able to afford the medications their pet needs.

    There are only 16 online pharmacies that are registered with the National Association of Boards of Pharmacy. This association reviews the pharmacy’s practices to ensure they are compliant with all proper requirements.

    While not completely fail-safe, experts I’ve listened to urge owners who wish to buy medications online to make sure they are doing business only with these sites. You can find the list atnabp.net

    One option that might be a possibility is to ask your vet if she or he will match the pricing of an Internet retailer. Our vet has given us a nominal discount or recommended a rebate that was otherwise unknown when we’ve asked.

    FOOD:

    The second area that you can possibly save yourself a good deal of money is pet food. There are many options available for feeding your pet. Some owners opt for economy varieties. Economy varieties include Alpo, Beneful, Hill’s Science Diet, Kibbles ‘n Bits, and Purina. There are manufacturer coupons aplenty, which can add to the savings. In our database at SavingsAngel.com, we regularly see these brands for 50-70% off retail prices. Getting deals like this involve timing your purchase and applying a high-value coupon at the same time.

    Obviously, these brands are inexpensive by comparison, but can contain a large amount of filler like wheat, corn and soy. It’s important that you review the labels and talk to your vet to discuss your pet’s needs. You can also choose premium brands like Iams, Eukanuba, and some varieties of Hill’s Science Diet. Large corporations own all these brands now (Procter & Gamble, Colgate-Palmolive). This is helpful from the standpoint in that coupons are available for budget-minded shoppers. Iams and Hill’s, for example, recently published a $3 coupon that can make for some very good savings. Hill’s is also offering a $12.99 rebate on selected varieties.

    When purchasing, make sure to read the label. There are four things you want to look for:

    1. The guaranteed analysis. (How much fat & protein in the food.

    2. The nutritional adequacy statement

    3. The ingredients (avoid foods with too much filler.)

    4. The feeding guidelines

    One website that you might find very useful in choosing a pet food dogfoodadvisor.com. This website is also very helpful in tracking pet food recalls. Sadly, recalls of pet food are fairly common.

    If you own a larger breed dog, you may find that more expensive varieties are outside your budget (unless you are using your coupons!) This makes it very important to talk to your vet to talk about what ingredients to look for. Your vet may also be able to give you some ideas regarding supplementing your dog’s nutrition.

    BOARDING:

    The price of boarding can vary wildly depending on the quality of the care. If you want to get a great deal on boarding, the best deals on good boarding facilities will be found on the daily deal sites (Groupon, etc…). With some careful watching, you’re bound to find a deal eventually – though the deals tend to be geared more for short term stays.

    Don’t be afraid to competitively shop the pet resorts – and ask if one location will match or beat the price of another – particularly if you are boarding for a longer period of time. Vacancy means lost revenue and pet boarding facilities are a business like any other who desire to stay busy. The best deals of all on pet care are going to come from exchanging pet sitting – or hiring a pet-loving tween. You can also ask for recommendations for reliable pet sitters at your local animal shelter or pet store. Pet sitters can charge a fraction of a pricey pet resort.

    TRAINING:

    Forget hiring the dog whisperer unless you have special needs. The Internet is FILLED with step by step instructions and video examples of how to train your pooch to do all the tricks you like – or overcome any naughty puppy behavior. A training class is helpful for socialization – but after your puppy is old enough, make sure the dog park and walks in dog occupied areas are part of your regular routine.

    PET INSURANCE:

    Pet insurance is usually not a good investment. “It’s common to pay $300 a year or more for pet insurance. Over the life of a dog or cat that might be $5,000 or more. Most people are not going to spend that kind of money on covered pet health care.

    For its August 2011 issue, Consumer Reports compared of nine pet policies for Roxy, a healthy 10-year-old beagle who lives near the magazine’s office in Yonkers, N.Y. Roxy’s lifetime vet bills have totaled $7,026 (in current dollars). In every case, the total premiums that would have been paid to those insurance companies were higher than Roxy’s medical bills. It makes more sense to put a couple of hundred dollars into a household emergency fund each year for serious pet health issues.

    From: http://abclocal.go.com/wls/story?section=resources&id=8713519

  • Pet Spending At An All Time High

    Posted on March 14th, 2012
    admin No comments

    As one would think, during a recession people would spend less on extras for their pets.  However, annual spending on pets has reached an all time high.

    In 2011, American Pet Products Association reported that Americans spent $50.96 billion on their pets – an all time high and the first time in history more than $50 billion has gone to dogs, cats, canaries, guppies and the sort.

    65% of that spending was for food and vet costs.  However, the service category, such as grooming, boarding, pet hotels, pet sitting and day care, grew more than any other.  It rose 7.9% from $3.51 billion in 2010 to $3.79 billion in 2011.

    Owners are conscious about taking care of their pets and are planning ahead for when they go on vacation.  Numbers indicate that animal sales and adoptions are flattening out and the number of people switching to a high end food products are topping out.  Pet ownership has become less of an impulse decision and seems that those that have made the commitment to having a pet want to do it right and make their pets the happiest they can be.

    Another area in the pet industry is pet insurance and is expected to grow rapidly.  In 2011, insurance was estimated to be at $450 million and is expected to grow over $500 million in 2012.

    Entrepreneurs and investors are also taking advantage of the growing pet industry as consumers are looking for creative and innovative products.  Products such as puzzle feeders for dogs along with bionic toys for destructive toys are some of the new products the pet industry is seeing consumers go after.  This proves people care about their pets enough to calm any type of separation anxiety or destructive issues.

    Always keep in mind Clear the Air offers wonderful range of Odor Eliminator products to make your pet enjoyably odor free!

  • Day #4 of Helpful Tips For You And Your Pet

    Posted on February 3rd, 2012
    admin No comments

    Day #4 of Helpful Tips For You And Your Pet

    Yesterday we discussed the steps you should take when bringing home a new pet.  If you have existing pets already, there are some additional steps to be taken to make sure everyone gets along together when they meet.

    Day #4: Introducing New Pets To Existing Pets

    Your pets’ personalities will determine whether or not the new pet will get along with the older one.  When a new pet is brought home, sometimes the older pet views him/her as a threat and this is only natural.  Expect a few scuffles at first to let them determine who is the boss and determine their place in the pack.  Of course you will want to supervise these initial meetings but do not interrupt them if there is no danger of injury.

    -Keep your pets separated until you are absolutely sure they will get along.  Only allow them to interact with your supervision.  Depending on their reactions to each other, it may take hours, days, weeks or even months for your pets to finally adjust to each other.

    -Keep the introductions indoors and controlled.  Especially if you are introducing a dog and cat, make sure the dog is on a leash to avoid chasing or cornering the cat.  This could be incredibly terrifying for the cat and you will prolong your process of eventually being able to tolerate each other.

    -Like above, keep cat and dog introductions controlled.  However you do not want to hold a cat in your arms when introducing him/her to a new pet.  A frightened and nervous cat is likely to scratch you and cause more stressful commotion.

    -Make sure you allow your pet to familiarize itself with his/her new home.  Allow him to explore and sniff out different areas of your home.

    -Always provide separate water and feeding bowls.  This allows your pet to calmly eat and drink without feeling the need to fight for their food.  Also, make sure cats have separate litter boxes as well.

    -Dogs and cats are able to live in harmony with caged animals but precautions must be taken when initially introducing them.  Cats are agile and placing a cage high up on a shelf doesn’t guaranteed your caged pet will stay safe.

    -Pets need to meet each other on their own time.  Don’t force them together, they will adjust at their own pace.

    Check back for more helpful pet tips to come!

  • Day #1 of Helpful Tips For You And Your Pet

    Posted on January 30th, 2012
    admin 1 comment

    This week and next, we are going to be sharing some Helpful Tips for you and your pet.  Each day we will have a new helpful tip for you and your pet to keep in mind.

    Day #1: Protect Your Pet From Everyday Household Dangers

    Just like you’d baby proof your house, keeping common household items out of reach from your pets will help protect them from danger.  Rodent poisons and insecticides are the most common sources of domesticated animal poisoning.  The following is a list of potentially toxic poisons that should at least be kept out of reach of your pets, it not completely avoided at all:

    • Fertilizer and Plant Food – These are easily accessible and fatal to a pet allowed in the yard unsupervised.
    • Cedar and soft wood shavings – Keep small animals such as hamsters and gerbils away from these as they emit toxic and potentially fatal fumes.
    • Antifreeze – One teaspoon can kill a seven pound cat.  With its sweet taste, animals are naturally attracted to antifreeze even when consumed in small quantities.  Antifreeze with propylene glycol is available and is safe for animals if ingested in small amounts.
    • Chocolate – This is poisonous to dogs, cats and ferrets even when a small amount is consumed.
    • De-icing salts – These salts used to melt snow and ice can irritate your pet’s paws and are especially poisonous if licked off.  Ensure your pet’s paws are washed and dried as soon as your pet comes in from the snow.
    • Nonstick cooking fumes – Fumes from self-cleaning ovens and nonstick cooking surfaces can be deadly to birds.  Make sure birds are kept away from the kitchen and use caution when using any pump or aerosol spray around birds.
    • Painkillers – Aspirin, Acetaminophen, Ibuprofen and many other types of pills can be toxic to animals.  Ensure you keep medication containers and tubes out of reach of pets so they can not be chewed through and ingested.  Also make sure to find and dispose of any dropped pills.
    • Chicken Bones – These can easily shatter and choke a cat or dog.  We also have a list of other plants and food items to keep away from your pets listed here.
    • Rawhide Chews – While these are made especially for dogs, make sure to supervise your dog while he/she chews the rawhide treat as they can pose a serious choking hazard.

    Of course, if you feel your pet has been poisoned, bring him in to your Veterinarian as soon as possible or call the ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center’s 24 hour hotline at 888-426-4435.

    Stay tuned this week to learn about more helpful pet tips!

  • You and Your Pet Bird – Good Things To Know

    Posted on January 26th, 2012
    admin 1 comment

    We came across some great tips for bird owners.  Of course, we always recommend using Clear the Air’s Odor Remover to sprinkle at the bottom of any animal cage to aid in eliminating odors.  It is completely safe around pets and children, even if eaten!

    If you haven’t already purchased your new pet bird, it is a good idea to get him either from a responsible breeder or, better yet, adopt one from a shelter or avian rescue group.  You can call your local shelter to see if they have any birds or know of any local bird rescues you can visit.

    Before bringing your bird home, you will want to make sure you purchase a large well constructed cage.  No matter the species, it is important for your bird to have enough room to stretch his wings and fly short distances.  To prevent escape or injury, the bars on the cage should only be .4 inches apart.  Horizontal bars and perches need to also be installed in your cage at varying heights.

    Line the bottom of the cage is plain paper or paper bags that are cut to size and make sure it is changed daily.  You can sprinkle Clear The Air’s Odor Remover to help eliminate bird odors every time you clean out your birds home.  Place your bird’s cage in a warm, bright part of the house off the floor that is close to where the action is but away from drafts and direct sunlight.  Make sure your bird is not close to the kitchen as they are extremely sensitive to fumes from ovens, cookware and such.

    When it comes to feeding your bird, pelleted food is the way to go.  While seed mixes provide variety, they do not always provide the best nutrition. A high quality food that is formulated for your bird’s species is ideal. Fresh veggies and fruits should be given to your bird every day.  Dark, leafy greens are packed with vitamins and many birds also enjoy carrots and broccoli.  Fresh cold water should also be available at all times and changed at least once a day.

    A trained and tamed bird will need at least an hour of exercise out of the cage in a safe and enclosed room every day.  He may simply want to just sit on your shoulder or explore the room.  For birds that do not take to handling, providing a selection of toys like ladders, swings and mirrors with bells are a great way to keep your bird entertained.

    Providing a shallow dish at the bottom of the cage is a great way to provide a bath for your bird and keeping his plumage looking perfect.  It is probably a good idea to schedule a bath right before you plan to clean out the cage.

    Take your bird to the vet annually.  Weight loss or gain is often an indicator of illness and your vet can conduct any necessary tests to help monitor your bird’s health.

    Clear The Air Odor Remover is a safe a non toxic way to eliminate odors in your bird cageClick Here to read more and purchase our Clear The Air Odor Remover.