• Pets And Fires – Keeping Your Pets Safe

    Posted on August 6th, 2018
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    With all the recent fires in California, we wanted to share some tips for keeping your pets safe if evacuation is ever needed.

    These tips are from the American Red Cross. Please remember to always have a plan in place for evacuation for you, your family and four legged babies!

    In order to help firefighters find your pets, The Red Cross suggests the following:

     

    • Keep pets near entrances when away from home. Keep collars on pets and leashes at the ready in case firefighters need to rescue your pet. When leaving pets home alone, keep them in areas or rooms near entrances where firefighters can easily find them.
    • Affix a pet alert window cling and write down the number of pets inside your house and attach the static cling to a front window. This critical information saves rescuers time when locating your pets. Make sure to keep the number of pets listed on them updated.

     

    Listening to evacuation orders is crucial. It is smart to practice what you would do in an evacuation with these helpful tips:

     

    • The best way to protect your pets from the effects of a fire is to include them in your family plan. This includes having their own disaster supplies kit as well as arranging in advance for a safe place for them to stay if you need to leave your home.
    • When you practice your escape plan, practice taking your pets with you. Train them to come to you when you call.
    • In the event of a disaster, if you must evacuate, the most important thing you can do to protect your pets is to evacuate them, too. But remember: never delay escape or endanger yourself or family to rescue a family pet.

    Check The American Red Cross for other helpful fire tips.

     

     

  • Halloween Safety For Your Pets

    Posted on October 31st, 2015
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    Halloween is an exciting time of year, but the excitement might be a little too much for your pets. It is important to take simple precautions on Halloween to keep your pets safe.

    Clear The Air would like to share these safety tips:

    • Don’t give your pets any candy and keep the candy bowl out of their reach. Chocolate, xylitol (a sugar substitute), and wrappers can be very dangerous for pets.
    • Make sure your pets are wearing their ID tags even if you don’t plan on taking them out. They could accidentally get out while the door is constantly opening and be scared off by Trick-or-Treaters coming to your house.
    • The loud voices, constant door bell ringing, and knocks on your door can stress out your pet. Keeping your pets in another room during Trick-or-Treating time will help your pets feel safe.
    • As a precaution, bring your outdoor pets inside to keep them safe from any cruel Halloween pranks.
    • Keep Halloween decorations away from pets. If you are going to display your pumpkins with candles, put them where you pets can’t reach or accidentally knock over.
    • Keep the costumes simple! Make sure they fit and are comfortable for your pet. Check for any loose pieces that you pet may be able to chew off and supervise them while they are dressed in costumes.
  • How To Eliminate Pet Urine and Feces Odors

    Posted on November 15th, 2014
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    Do you have pet odors in your home you can’t get rid of?

    Cat & dog urine odor is one of the strongest and toughest odors to get rid of. Most products on the market are wet and must come into contact with the urine to remove the odor. This means if you have urine that has soaked into the carpet you must pull up the carpet and pad and soak the carpet, pad and floorboards. What a mess!


    With Clear The Air Cat & Dog Urine Odor Eliminator just sprinkle the granules on top of the carpet leave on overnight and vacuum in the morning and the odor is completely eliminated. Works well on all surfaces pulling the odors out of tile and concrete. Will completely eliminate the odors from your liter box, no one will know you have a litter box in the house!

    Directions to Eliminate Cat Urine Odors From Litter Box

    • Add granules to bottom of litter box, add litter, then add additional granules on top.
    • Add 1/2 cup of granules each time litter is changed, scooped or as needed.
    • Will prolong the life of your litter.

    Directions to Eliminate Urine Odors From Carpets, Wood Floors, Tile, Concrete or Furniture

    • Remove feces and excess urine.
    • Sprinkle granules over area until dry granules are present on top. Also works well on old dry urine odors.
    • Leave down 24 hours then sweep or vacuum.
    • Clear The Air pulls odors from carpet, padding, and subfloor.
    • Typically one application will eliminate all odors; occasionally a second application is necessary.
    • One canister covers 100 square feet.

    Directions to Eliminate Pet Odors from Pet, Pet Beds, or Car

    • Sprinkle granules directly on pet, gently work into coat. Leave on as long as pet will tolerate.  It is best to do this outside so your pet can shake off the granules.  Repeat as necessary.
    • Sprinkle directly on pet beds, leave down 24 hours shake off or vacuum.  Also hang an Odor Eliminator Bag near the pet bed.
    • Sprinkle granules on car seats and carpet.  Leave down 24 hours.  Sweep or vacuum.   Leave a couple window cracked for air circulation.  Also add an Odor Eliminator Bag to your car to continue to remove odors
  • Disaster Preparedness For Your Pets

    Posted on September 12th, 2014
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    Each type of disaster requires different measures to keep your pets safe. The best thing you can do for yourself and your pets is to be prepared. Here are some tips for the ASPCA to help you prepare for an evacuation with your family and pets.

    Step 1: Get a Rescue Alert Sticker

    This easy-to-use sticker will let people know that pets are inside your home. Make sure it is visible to rescue workers, and that it includes 1) the types and number of pets in your household; 2) the name of your veterinarian; and 3) your veterinarian’s phone number. If you must evacuate with your pets, and if time allows, write “EVACUATED” across the stickers.

    To get a free emergency pet alert sticker for your home, please fill out our online order form; please allow 6-8 weeks for delivery. Your local pet supply store may also sell similar stickers.

    Step 2: Arrange a Safe Haven

    Arrange a safe haven for your pets in the event of evacuation. DO NOT LEAVE YOUR PETS BEHIND. Remember, if it isn’t safe for you, it isn’t safe for your pets. They may become trapped or escape and be exposed to numerous life-threatening hazards. Note that not all Red Cross disaster shelters accept pets, so it is imperative that you have determined where you will bring your pets ahead of time

    Step 3: Emergency Supplies and Traveling Kits

    Keep an Evac-Pack and supplies handy for your pets. Make sure that everyone in the family knows where it is. This kit should be clearly labeled and easy to carry. Items to consider keeping in or near your pack include:

    • Pet first-aid kit and guide book – ask your vet what to include
    • 3-7 days’ worth of canned (pop-top) or dry food (be sure to rotate every two months)
    • Disposable litter trays (aluminum roasting pans are perfect)
    • Litter or paper toweling
    • Liquid dish soap and disinfectant
    • Disposable garbage bags for clean-up
    • Pet feeding dishes
    • Extra collar or harness as well as an extra leash
    • Photocopies of medical records and a waterproof container with a two-week supply of any medicine your pet requires (Remember, food and medications need to be rotated out of your emergency kit—otherwise they may go bad or become useless.)
    • Bottled water, at least 7 days’ worth for each person and pet (store in a cool, dry place and replace every two months)
    • A traveling bag, crate or sturdy carrier, ideally one for each pet
    • Flashlight
    • Blanket (for scooping up a fearful pet)
    • Recent photos of your pets (in case you are separated and need to make “Lost” posters)
    • Especially for cats: Pillowcase or EvackSack, toys, scoopable litter
    • Especially for dogs: Extra leash, toys and chew toys, a week’s worth of cage liner.

    Step 4: Choose “Designated Caregivers”

    This step will take considerable time and thought. When choosing a temporary caregiver, consider someone who lives close to your residence. He or she should be someone who is generally home during the day while you are at work or has easy access to your home. A set of keys should be given to this trusted individual. This may work well with neighbors who have pets of their own—you may even swap responsibilities, depending upon who has accessibility.

    Step 5: Evacuation Preparation

    If you must evacuate your home in a crisis, plan for the worst-case scenario. If you think you may be gone for only a day, assume that you may not be allowed to return for several weeks. When recommendations for evacuation have been announced, follow the instructions of local and state officials.

    Click here to read the entire article on Disaster Preparedness.

  • How To Safely Travel With Your Pet

    Posted on August 31st, 2014
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    Traveling with a pet involves more than just loading the animal in the back seat and motoring off. The ASPCA offers the following tips to help you prepare for a safe and smooth car trip:

    • Keep your pets safe and secure in a well-ventilated crate or carrier. There are a variety of wire mesh, hard plastic and soft-sided carriers available. Whatever you choose, make sure it’s large enough for your pet to stand, sit, lie down and turn around in. And P.S., it’s smart to get your pet used to the carrier in the comfort of your home before your trip.
    • Get your pet geared up for a long trip by taking him on a series of short drives first, gradually lengthening time spent in the car. And please be sure to always secure the crate so it won’t slide or shift in the event of a quick stop.
    • Your pet’s travel-feeding schedule should start with a light meal three to four hours prior to departure. Don’t feed your furry friend in a moving vehicle—even if it is a long drive.
    • Never leave your animal alone in a parked vehicle. On a hot day, even with the windows open, a parked automobile can become a furnace in no time, and heatstroke can develop. In cold weather, a car can act as a refrigerator, holding in the cold and causing the animal to freeze to death.
    • What in your pet’s traveling kit? In addition to travel papers, food, bowl, leash, a waste scoop, plastic bags, grooming supplies, medication and a pet first-aid kit, pack a favorite toy or pillow to give your pet a sense of familiarity.
    • Make sure your pet has a microchip for identification and wears a collar with a tag imprinted with your home address, as well as a temporary travel tag with your cell phone, destination phone number and any other relevant contact information. Canines should wear flat (never choke!) collars, please.
    • Don’t allow your pet to ride with his head outside the window. He could be injured by flying objects. And please keep him in the back seat in his crate or with a harness attached to a seat buckle.
    • Traveling across state lines? Bring along your pet’s rabies vaccination record, as some states requires this proof at certain interstate crossings. While this generally isn’t a problem, it’s always smart to be on the safe side.
    • When it comes to H2O, we say BYO. Opt for bottled water or tap water stored in plastic jugs. Drinking water from an area he’s not used to could result in tummy upset for your pet.
    • If you travel frequently with your pet, you may want to invest in rubberized floor liners and waterproof seat covers, available at auto product retailers.
  • Dogs Or Cats?

    Posted on August 21st, 2014
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    Are you a dog person or a cat person?

    Clear The Air came across Dr. Mercola’s article about the differences between dogs and cats and we would like to share it with our readers:

    • Dogs can be trained quickly, some in a matter of minutes, to obey basic commands like ‘come’ and ‘sit.’
    • Most cats are difficult if not impossible to train to respond to directives.
    • Cats can be house-trained in an instant as long as they have access to a litter box. There’s really no training to it, in fact. It’s instinct.
    • Most dogs take considerably longer to housebreak, and some just never get all the way there. Unlike with Fluffy, housebreaking a pup is usually a hands-on, time intensive project.
    • Dogs are social beings. They want to be with their pack, wherever their pack may be.
    • Cats are solitary by comparison and their primary attachment (when forced to choose) is to their territory rather than other two or four-legged animals.
    • Dogs have 42 teeth.
    • Cats have 30.
    • Cats can jump and climb, giving them more options when they need to hunt for food, or when they feel threatened.
    • Dogs are earthbound, so they need their pack to hunt effectively. And when a threat triggers their fight-or-flight response, they are more likely to react with aggression because their ability to flee from a predator is limited.
    • Dogs are scavenging carnivores, which means although they are primarily meat-eaters, if necessary they can survive on plant material alone (remember, surviving is different than thriving).
    • Cats are obligate or strict carnivores. Kitties cannot sustain life without eating meat in some form.
    • Dogs in the wild catch their prey by running it down. They are long distance runners, not sprinters.
    • Cats creep up on their prey and catch it by surprise. They are sprinters, not distance runners.
    • Cats cannot be fasted and should not be dieted down too quickly. Kitties don’t efficiently burn fat reserves as an energy source. Instead, without food, their bodies break down non-fatty tissues for energy. This can lead to a life-threatening liver condition called hepatic lipidosis.
    • Dogs are much better at using their fat reserves and can tolerate a lack of food for much longer than cats.
    • Cats have retractable claws that stay sharp because they are protected inside the toes.
    • Dogs claws are always extended and become blunt from constant contact with the ground when they walk.
    • A dog’s memory is only about five minutes long.
    • Kitties can remember up to 16 hours.

    Read entire article about dog and cat differences from Dr. Mercola here.

    Ten Interesting Differences Between Cats and Dogs

    Dogs can be trained quickly, some in a matter of minutes, to obey basic commands like ‘come’ and ‘sit.’

    Most cats are difficult if not impossible to train to respond to directives.

    Cats can be housetrained in an instant as long as they have access to a litter box. There’s really no training to it, in fact. It’s instinct.

    Most dogs take considerably longer to housebreak, and some just never get all the way there. Unlike with Fluffy, housebreaking a pup is usually a hands-on, time intensive project.

    Dogs are social beings. They want to be with their pack, wherever their pack may be.

    Cats are solitary by comparison and their primary attachment (when forced to choose) is to their territory rather than other two or four-legged animals.

    Dogs have 42 teeth.

    Cats have 30.

    Cats can jump and climb, giving them more options when they need to hunt for food, or when they feel threatened.

    Dogs are earthbound, so they need their pack to hunt effectively. And when a threat triggers their fight-or-flight response, they are more likely to react with aggression because their ability to flee from a predator is limited.

    Dogs are scavenging carnivores, which means although they are primarily meat-eaters, if necessary they can survive on plant material alone (remember, surviving is different than thriving).

    Cats are obligate or strict carnivores. Kitties cannot sustain life without eating meat in some form.

    Dogs in the wild catch their prey by running it down. They are long distance runners, not sprinters.

    Cats creep up on their prey and catch it by surprise. They are sprinters, not distance runners.

    Cats cannot be fasted and should not be dieted down too quickly. Kitties don’t efficiently burn fat reserves as an energy source. Instead, without food, their bodies break down non-fatty tissues for energy. This can lead to a life-threatening liver condition called hepatic lipidosis.

    Dogs are much better at using their fat reserves and can tolerate a lack of food for much longer than cats.

    Cats have retractable claws that stay sharp because they are protected inside the toes.

    Dogs claws are always extended and become blunt from constant contact with the ground when they walk.

    A dog’s memory is only about five minutes long.

    Kitties can remember up to 16 hours.

  • Summer Heat Safety Tips For Your Pets

    Posted on August 6th, 2014
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    We all love spending the long, sunny days of summer outdoors with our furry companions, but the ASPCA warns being overeager in hot weather can spell danger.

    Take these simple precautions, provided by ASPCA experts, to help prevent your pet from overheating. And if you suspect your pet is suffering from heat stroke, get help from your veterinarian immediately.

    • Pets can get dehydrated quickly, so give them plenty of fresh, clean water when it’s hot outdoors. Make sure your pets have a shady place to get out of the sun, be careful to not over-exercise them, and keep them indoors when it’s extremely hot.
    • Symptoms of overheating in pets include excessive panting or difficulty breathing, increased heart and respiratory rate, drooling, mild weakness, stupor or even collapse. They can also include seizures, bloody diarrhea and vomit along with an elevated body temperature of over 104 degrees.
    • Never leave your animals alone in a parked vehicle. Parked cars can heat up extremely rapidly even with the windows open!
    • Do not leave pets unsupervised around a pool-not all dogs are good swimmers. Introduce your pets to water gradually and make sure they wear flotation devices when on boats.
    • Feel free to trim longer hair on your dog, but never shave your dog: The layers of dogs’ coats protect them from overheating and sunburn. Brushing cats more often than usual can prevent problems caused by excessive heat.
    • When the temperature is very high, don’t let your dog linger on hot asphalt. Being so close the ground, your pooch’s body can heat up quickly, and sensitive paw pads can burn. Keep walks during these times to a minimum.
  • What Others Are Saying About Clear The Air’s Odor Eliminators

    Posted on July 30th, 2014
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    Did you know we offer a 100% guarantee that our product will eliminate any odor?

    Clear The Air produces amazing results when it comes to eliminating odors. See what others say about our products:

    Our cat was recently diagnosed with diabetes and has since contracted a bladder infection. To our complete annoyance, this caused him to not use the litter box and instead was using the carpeting. I bought this before the problem got completely out of hand and it worked like a charm. The directions say to let it sit overnight before vacuuming but of course I couldn’t wait that long and it still worked. Will be getting more of this product for future needs. ~Norah

    It magically absorbs pet odors from my carpets, even in high heat and humidity. It’s great for between shampooings. Just sprinkle, let it sit overnight and vacuum. ~Jayne

    I have tried 4 or 5 different products trying to get the old urine smells our of our carpet from my black lab’s potty training accidents. Nothing had worked. I thought I’d try this product, and since there was a money back guarantee, I figured I didn’t have anything to lose. I followed the instructions, sprinkled it on the carpet right before we went to bed, and then vacuumed it up the next morning, and just like that, the smell was gone! Finally my house smells fresh and clean again! 5 Paws up for Clear the Air! ~Ace’s Mom

    I have a house full of pets and someone is always leaving me a “surprise” Ive tried everything and nothing has worked or even come close to working except this! It TOOK the smell out of the carpet, not cover it up with perfumes. Ive even used it on my furniture just to freshen it up. And it really does work on wood floors too! I love this stuff!

  • Happy Fourth Of July – Keep Your Pets Safe!

    Posted on July 3rd, 2014
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    Did you know the Fourth Of July is the biggest day of the year that pets get lost?

    The animals shelters receive the most lost and scared pets on the Fourth Of July than any other day of the year.

    Please keep your pets safe at home and read our blog to make sure you are doing everything for your pet’s safety:

    • Don’t leave your pets outside. Even if your pet is used to being outside, the loud noises from fireworks may make them break free from their restraint or jump the fence if they are trying to find safety from the noise.
    • Keep alcohol away from pets. Pets can become dangerously intoxicated, go into a coma or even die from respiratory failure.
    • Leave your pet at home if going to watch fireworks. The combination of too many people and loud fireworks will cause your pet to freak out and do anything they can to seek shelter. Do not lock them in the car either!
    • Microchip your pet and make sure he or she has ID tags. If your pet does manage to get loose, an ID tag with your name and phone number on it will help your dog find his way back home. You also want to make sure your pet is micro-chipped.
    • Never use fireworks around your pet. Lit fireworks will not only scare your pet but they can cause severe burns, trauma to the face or paws and even death. They also contain toxic substances even when unused.
    • Don’t feed your pet from the table. Avoid giving your pet table food while you are barbequing or enjoying a backyard party. Onions, coffee, avocado, grapes, raisins, salt and more are all hazardous to your pets.
    • Oils, citronella candles, insect coils and other insect repellant products are toxic to your pet. Inhaling these toxins can result in respiratory illness such as pneumonia and indigestion which can harm your pet’s nervous system.

    What do you do to keep your pet safe and secure on the Fourth? Comment on our blog.

  • Mouse And Wifi Are Ready For Adoption!

    Posted on June 30th, 2014
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    Have you heard about Mouse and Wifi?

    A Cox Communications employee was shocked after he opened a box at work and found two newborn kittens clinging to life inside.

    The two kittens have now recovered after they were found inside a box packed with fiberglass equipment that arrived from Hollywood and are available for adoption from the San Diego Humane Society!  after they were found inside a box packed with fiberglass equipment that arrived from Hollywood.

    Here’s their latest update:

    Mouse and Wifi are ready to find their new home!

    We’re so happy to tell you that Mouse and Wifi, the kittens who made the treacherous journey from LA to San Diego in a Cox Communications box, are officially ready for adoption! Orphaned, newborn kittens have such a struggle to stay alive, and their rough start made the first weeks of their lives even harder. They have been through many ups and downs as they have grown into the kittens they are today…and they did it together. Both kittens are now happy, healthy and growing strong, and we would like them to be adopted together. They have developed such a bond of friendship and support and it would be a shame to split them up!

    If you’d like to open your heart and home and adopt Mouse and Wifi, please apply in person at our 5500 Gaines Street location in San Diego. We will be accepting applications through Thursday, July 3 at 6 p.m. Please include in your application a paragraph of no more than 250 words about why you would be the best pet guardian for Mouse and Wifi. We will contact the lucky adopter by July 8th.

    Read more about Mouse and Wifi from the San Diego Humane Society.