• Pets And Fires – Keeping Your Pets Safe

    Posted on August 6th, 2018
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    With all the recent fires in California, we wanted to share some tips for keeping your pets safe if evacuation is ever needed.

    These tips are from the American Red Cross. Please remember to always have a plan in place for evacuation for you, your family and four legged babies!

    In order to help firefighters find your pets, The Red Cross suggests the following:

     

    • Keep pets near entrances when away from home. Keep collars on pets and leashes at the ready in case firefighters need to rescue your pet. When leaving pets home alone, keep them in areas or rooms near entrances where firefighters can easily find them.
    • Affix a pet alert window cling and write down the number of pets inside your house and attach the static cling to a front window. This critical information saves rescuers time when locating your pets. Make sure to keep the number of pets listed on them updated.

     

    Listening to evacuation orders is crucial. It is smart to practice what you would do in an evacuation with these helpful tips:

     

    • The best way to protect your pets from the effects of a fire is to include them in your family plan. This includes having their own disaster supplies kit as well as arranging in advance for a safe place for them to stay if you need to leave your home.
    • When you practice your escape plan, practice taking your pets with you. Train them to come to you when you call.
    • In the event of a disaster, if you must evacuate, the most important thing you can do to protect your pets is to evacuate them, too. But remember: never delay escape or endanger yourself or family to rescue a family pet.

    Check The American Red Cross for other helpful fire tips.

     

     

  • How To Eliminate Pet Urine and Feces Odors

    Posted on November 15th, 2014
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    Do you have pet odors in your home you can’t get rid of?

    Cat & dog urine odor is one of the strongest and toughest odors to get rid of. Most products on the market are wet and must come into contact with the urine to remove the odor. This means if you have urine that has soaked into the carpet you must pull up the carpet and pad and soak the carpet, pad and floorboards. What a mess!


    With Clear The Air Cat & Dog Urine Odor Eliminator just sprinkle the granules on top of the carpet leave on overnight and vacuum in the morning and the odor is completely eliminated. Works well on all surfaces pulling the odors out of tile and concrete. Will completely eliminate the odors from your liter box, no one will know you have a litter box in the house!

    Directions to Eliminate Cat Urine Odors From Litter Box

    • Add granules to bottom of litter box, add litter, then add additional granules on top.
    • Add 1/2 cup of granules each time litter is changed, scooped or as needed.
    • Will prolong the life of your litter.

    Directions to Eliminate Urine Odors From Carpets, Wood Floors, Tile, Concrete or Furniture

    • Remove feces and excess urine.
    • Sprinkle granules over area until dry granules are present on top. Also works well on old dry urine odors.
    • Leave down 24 hours then sweep or vacuum.
    • Clear The Air pulls odors from carpet, padding, and subfloor.
    • Typically one application will eliminate all odors; occasionally a second application is necessary.
    • One canister covers 100 square feet.

    Directions to Eliminate Pet Odors from Pet, Pet Beds, or Car

    • Sprinkle granules directly on pet, gently work into coat. Leave on as long as pet will tolerate.  It is best to do this outside so your pet can shake off the granules.  Repeat as necessary.
    • Sprinkle directly on pet beds, leave down 24 hours shake off or vacuum.  Also hang an Odor Eliminator Bag near the pet bed.
    • Sprinkle granules on car seats and carpet.  Leave down 24 hours.  Sweep or vacuum.   Leave a couple window cracked for air circulation.  Also add an Odor Eliminator Bag to your car to continue to remove odors
  • Keeping Your Dog and Cat Active

    Posted on November 13th, 2014
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    Are your pets at home alone all day??

    While you are at work, your dogs and cats are sitting at home just waiting for you to come home. Some pets may even chew up the furniture just because they are bored. Pets need to be active and need mental stimulation, it is important for their health. You can also help prevent problem behaviors by providing your pets with toys or activities to do while you are gone.

    Here are some tips from the ASPCA on how to keep your dog and cat active when you are home and when you aren’t.

  • Move it! Healthy adult dogs need at least 30 minutes of aerobic exercise twice a day. Jogging, swimming and playing at the dog park are all great ways to burn excess energy.
  • Engage in structured games, like fetch and tug-of-war—they’re not only great exercise but also teach your pet impulse control and strengthen the bond between you.
  • Keep your dog occupied when he’s home alone by giving him a food-stuffed puzzle toy, like the Kong, or some tasty chew toys.
  • Like their canine counterparts, cats also need plenty of aerobic exercise. Get kitty fit with rousing play sessions, such as chase and fetch with furry toys, small balls or toy mice.
  • Encourage your cat’s favorite home alone activities, including bird watching, exploring paper bags or boxes, watching cat videos or spending time in secure outdoor enclosures.
  • Teach your cat new tricks! Felines are quick studies and can learn practical skills like coming when called, sitting up, rolling over and even using the toilet!
  • How To Safely Travel With Your Pet

    Posted on August 31st, 2014
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    Traveling with a pet involves more than just loading the animal in the back seat and motoring off. The ASPCA offers the following tips to help you prepare for a safe and smooth car trip:

    • Keep your pets safe and secure in a well-ventilated crate or carrier. There are a variety of wire mesh, hard plastic and soft-sided carriers available. Whatever you choose, make sure it’s large enough for your pet to stand, sit, lie down and turn around in. And P.S., it’s smart to get your pet used to the carrier in the comfort of your home before your trip.
    • Get your pet geared up for a long trip by taking him on a series of short drives first, gradually lengthening time spent in the car. And please be sure to always secure the crate so it won’t slide or shift in the event of a quick stop.
    • Your pet’s travel-feeding schedule should start with a light meal three to four hours prior to departure. Don’t feed your furry friend in a moving vehicle—even if it is a long drive.
    • Never leave your animal alone in a parked vehicle. On a hot day, even with the windows open, a parked automobile can become a furnace in no time, and heatstroke can develop. In cold weather, a car can act as a refrigerator, holding in the cold and causing the animal to freeze to death.
    • What in your pet’s traveling kit? In addition to travel papers, food, bowl, leash, a waste scoop, plastic bags, grooming supplies, medication and a pet first-aid kit, pack a favorite toy or pillow to give your pet a sense of familiarity.
    • Make sure your pet has a microchip for identification and wears a collar with a tag imprinted with your home address, as well as a temporary travel tag with your cell phone, destination phone number and any other relevant contact information. Canines should wear flat (never choke!) collars, please.
    • Don’t allow your pet to ride with his head outside the window. He could be injured by flying objects. And please keep him in the back seat in his crate or with a harness attached to a seat buckle.
    • Traveling across state lines? Bring along your pet’s rabies vaccination record, as some states requires this proof at certain interstate crossings. While this generally isn’t a problem, it’s always smart to be on the safe side.
    • When it comes to H2O, we say BYO. Opt for bottled water or tap water stored in plastic jugs. Drinking water from an area he’s not used to could result in tummy upset for your pet.
    • If you travel frequently with your pet, you may want to invest in rubberized floor liners and waterproof seat covers, available at auto product retailers.
  • Dogs Or Cats?

    Posted on August 21st, 2014
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    Are you a dog person or a cat person?

    Clear The Air came across Dr. Mercola’s article about the differences between dogs and cats and we would like to share it with our readers:

    • Dogs can be trained quickly, some in a matter of minutes, to obey basic commands like ‘come’ and ‘sit.’
    • Most cats are difficult if not impossible to train to respond to directives.
    • Cats can be house-trained in an instant as long as they have access to a litter box. There’s really no training to it, in fact. It’s instinct.
    • Most dogs take considerably longer to housebreak, and some just never get all the way there. Unlike with Fluffy, housebreaking a pup is usually a hands-on, time intensive project.
    • Dogs are social beings. They want to be with their pack, wherever their pack may be.
    • Cats are solitary by comparison and their primary attachment (when forced to choose) is to their territory rather than other two or four-legged animals.
    • Dogs have 42 teeth.
    • Cats have 30.
    • Cats can jump and climb, giving them more options when they need to hunt for food, or when they feel threatened.
    • Dogs are earthbound, so they need their pack to hunt effectively. And when a threat triggers their fight-or-flight response, they are more likely to react with aggression because their ability to flee from a predator is limited.
    • Dogs are scavenging carnivores, which means although they are primarily meat-eaters, if necessary they can survive on plant material alone (remember, surviving is different than thriving).
    • Cats are obligate or strict carnivores. Kitties cannot sustain life without eating meat in some form.
    • Dogs in the wild catch their prey by running it down. They are long distance runners, not sprinters.
    • Cats creep up on their prey and catch it by surprise. They are sprinters, not distance runners.
    • Cats cannot be fasted and should not be dieted down too quickly. Kitties don’t efficiently burn fat reserves as an energy source. Instead, without food, their bodies break down non-fatty tissues for energy. This can lead to a life-threatening liver condition called hepatic lipidosis.
    • Dogs are much better at using their fat reserves and can tolerate a lack of food for much longer than cats.
    • Cats have retractable claws that stay sharp because they are protected inside the toes.
    • Dogs claws are always extended and become blunt from constant contact with the ground when they walk.
    • A dog’s memory is only about five minutes long.
    • Kitties can remember up to 16 hours.

    Read entire article about dog and cat differences from Dr. Mercola here.

    Ten Interesting Differences Between Cats and Dogs

    Dogs can be trained quickly, some in a matter of minutes, to obey basic commands like ‘come’ and ‘sit.’

    Most cats are difficult if not impossible to train to respond to directives.

    Cats can be housetrained in an instant as long as they have access to a litter box. There’s really no training to it, in fact. It’s instinct.

    Most dogs take considerably longer to housebreak, and some just never get all the way there. Unlike with Fluffy, housebreaking a pup is usually a hands-on, time intensive project.

    Dogs are social beings. They want to be with their pack, wherever their pack may be.

    Cats are solitary by comparison and their primary attachment (when forced to choose) is to their territory rather than other two or four-legged animals.

    Dogs have 42 teeth.

    Cats have 30.

    Cats can jump and climb, giving them more options when they need to hunt for food, or when they feel threatened.

    Dogs are earthbound, so they need their pack to hunt effectively. And when a threat triggers their fight-or-flight response, they are more likely to react with aggression because their ability to flee from a predator is limited.

    Dogs are scavenging carnivores, which means although they are primarily meat-eaters, if necessary they can survive on plant material alone (remember, surviving is different than thriving).

    Cats are obligate or strict carnivores. Kitties cannot sustain life without eating meat in some form.

    Dogs in the wild catch their prey by running it down. They are long distance runners, not sprinters.

    Cats creep up on their prey and catch it by surprise. They are sprinters, not distance runners.

    Cats cannot be fasted and should not be dieted down too quickly. Kitties don’t efficiently burn fat reserves as an energy source. Instead, without food, their bodies break down non-fatty tissues for energy. This can lead to a life-threatening liver condition called hepatic lipidosis.

    Dogs are much better at using their fat reserves and can tolerate a lack of food for much longer than cats.

    Cats have retractable claws that stay sharp because they are protected inside the toes.

    Dogs claws are always extended and become blunt from constant contact with the ground when they walk.

    A dog’s memory is only about five minutes long.

    Kitties can remember up to 16 hours.

  • Dogs In Hot Cars

    Posted on August 18th, 2014
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    Urgent Alert – A Note From The ASPCA on leaving pets in your car.

    From the ASPCA – Please do not leave your pets in the car! Cars can heat up incredibly fast and are an extremely dangerous place for your pets!

    As summer heats up, it’s tempting to bring your pet with you on car rides around town. Sadly, many people believe that cracking a window is enough to keep their dogs cool in the car while they make a quick pit stop—but they couldn’t be more wrong. When it’s 80 degrees outside, your car will be a staggering 114 degrees in less than 30 minutes.

    Worse still, dog can’t cool themselves down as easily as people, and once they overheat, they can suffer extensive organ damage or die. That’s why leaving an animal alone in a car is more than just a bad idea, it’s a form of animal cruelty. And since the ASPCA can’t be everywhere at all times, we need YOU to be our eyes and ears on the ground.

    To help save animals from dying in hot cars, take the following actions:

    • Immediately call animal control or 911 if you see an animal trapped in a hot car. Local law officials have the ability to enter the vehicle and rescue the pet.
    • Do not leave until help has arrived.
    • Notify the managers of nearby businesses so they can make an urgent announcement.
    • Sign our Hot Car Pledge to help save lives this summer and all year long.

    We are working hard to spread awareness about the dangers of hot cars, but all too often, the difference between life and death comes down to the actions of individuals like you. We hope you will join our cause by keeping an eye out for dogs in distress, and by making a donation today. Together, we can prevent more tragedies and make this summer our safest season yet.

    Read entire article about Dogs In Hot Cars from the ASPCA.

  • How To Potty Train Your Puppy

    Posted on August 10th, 2014
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    Puppies are cute but potty training can be tough! Check out our helpful puppy potty training tips below.

    Teaching your puppy how to potty train? Clear the Air works great for eliminating odors from your dog’s accidents in the house. Plus, it is non-toxic and completely safe even if ingested.

    Check out some helpful potty training tips for your dog:

    • Restrict your dog’s access to the house. Making his environment smaller makes him less apt to have an accident. This same process can also be used for crate training.
    • Keep your dog with you, or keep an eye on him. Dogs usually like to sneak off to have accidents, if you can’t see him, he might be getting into something he shouldn’t be.
    • Go outside with him when teaching your dog to potty train. If you don’t see him urinating and defecating outside he might just be playing and not taking care of business. Plus going out with him teaches you about his routine.
    • Quietly praise your dog for going potty outside. Don’t reprimand him for making a mistake, just distract him and get him outside as soon as you can.
    • If you have a dog that likes one particular area specifically, you can put his food near that area and he will not urinate or defecate where he eats. But be careful, this sometimes doesn’t address the problem and the dog finds a new spot.
    • Utilize a crate, or a baby gate, or an exercise pen when you are not home. If you are diligent about keeping your dog with you when you are home, but he pees or poops as soon as you leave it is defeating your hard work. Crates are a wonderful tool for potty training.
    • Do not use puppy pads or indoor aids when potty training if you want your dog to potty outside. Encouraging potty indoor sometimes, but then wanting them to go outside is confusing. Choose one or the other and stick with it.
    • Be consistent and use lots of praise while controlling his environment and soon your dog will be happily going potty outside. Do you have potty training tips you’d like to share? Please comment on our blog.
  • How To Avoid A Missing Dog

    Posted on August 9th, 2014
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    There are many reason a dog may get lost. Find out how to keep your pet safely at home.

    Clear The Air would like to share some helpful tips from Cesar Milan about preventing your dog from getting lost. Please keep these tips in mind so your dog enjoys a safe and happy life with you!

    • The eyes have it – The easiest and surest way to keep your dog safe is to be able to see where he is at all times. And notice we say “see” and not “know.” You may think you know your dog is playing in your fenced-in backyard, but if you don’t have an eye on him, he could have run out of a gate that was left open, dug a hole under the fence to freedom, or be stolen by a criminal. Likewise if you’re walking your dog, don’t tie her up to the parking meter outside your favorite store or coffee shop while you run errands. Your dog could slip her collar, chew through her leash, or be stolen. Better to have the caffeine headache now than the headache and heartache of a missing pet later.
    • Get a new leash on life – Whenever possible, keep your dog on a good leash when out in the world. Even if you’re just letting your dog follow at your heels as you go to the mailbox, a stray squirrel or rabbit in the corner of your dog’s eye could cause him to bolt into traffic or down the street, and you are probably not going to catch him. It could easily result in your dog getting lost, the further he runs, or worse, injured or killed in traffic.
    • A dog by a different collar – A good collar that fits well is your best line of defense for two reasons: it keeps your dog from slipping out of it and getting loose; and it provides an easy way to ID your dog and makes your contact information available so you can get her back. It seems like fancy dog boutiques are popping up on every block so finding a good collar should be easy. But be mindful that the collar needs to be functional before fashionable. Your dog’s collar can literally save its life and it’s far more important that it stay securely on your dog and provide your contact info than alert the world in rhinestones that your dog has “Bieber fever.” Additionally, regularly check the fit of the dog collar as it is likely to stretch out over time or crack or fray depending on the material it’s made of, making it less secure. It may need to be tightened or replaced.
    • Microchipping—not just for computers – Microchipping involves implanting a tiny rice-grain-sized chip under your dog’s skin. It’s painless and can help your dog be identified with a scanner. Even if your dog loses his collar (or in the case of dognapping, has it removed), the microchip allows your dog to be positively identified as yours. This shouldn’t be regarded as a substitute for the collar and ID however. The microchip is a worst-case scenario for identifying your dog. It’s a lot easier for Good Samaritans to call the phone number that’s right there on the dog’s collar than to find a shelter or vet that can scan the microchip (if the Good Samaritan even thinks to do that). However, the microchip gives you a fighting chance your dog might be identified without a collar and provides excellent legal recourse should a dispute arise over who owns the lost dog.

    Read more tips from Cesar Milan here.

  • Summer Heat Safety Tips For Your Pets

    Posted on August 6th, 2014
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    We all love spending the long, sunny days of summer outdoors with our furry companions, but the ASPCA warns being overeager in hot weather can spell danger.

    Take these simple precautions, provided by ASPCA experts, to help prevent your pet from overheating. And if you suspect your pet is suffering from heat stroke, get help from your veterinarian immediately.

    • Pets can get dehydrated quickly, so give them plenty of fresh, clean water when it’s hot outdoors. Make sure your pets have a shady place to get out of the sun, be careful to not over-exercise them, and keep them indoors when it’s extremely hot.
    • Symptoms of overheating in pets include excessive panting or difficulty breathing, increased heart and respiratory rate, drooling, mild weakness, stupor or even collapse. They can also include seizures, bloody diarrhea and vomit along with an elevated body temperature of over 104 degrees.
    • Never leave your animals alone in a parked vehicle. Parked cars can heat up extremely rapidly even with the windows open!
    • Do not leave pets unsupervised around a pool-not all dogs are good swimmers. Introduce your pets to water gradually and make sure they wear flotation devices when on boats.
    • Feel free to trim longer hair on your dog, but never shave your dog: The layers of dogs’ coats protect them from overheating and sunburn. Brushing cats more often than usual can prevent problems caused by excessive heat.
    • When the temperature is very high, don’t let your dog linger on hot asphalt. Being so close the ground, your pooch’s body can heat up quickly, and sensitive paw pads can burn. Keep walks during these times to a minimum.
  • How To Eliminate RV Odors

    Posted on August 4th, 2014
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    Sadly summer is at a close. If you own an RV and use it regularly for summer trips, continue reading…

    Clear The Air can eliminate any and all RV odors you may experience. Many times RV’s can harbor foul odors because they do not always get the air circulation they need during the off season.

    If you smell unpleasant odors in your RV or are planning to store your RV for the Fall and Winter time, we suggest you use Clear The Air’s Odor Eliminating Bags to keep odors away.

    Air fresheners just mask the odors and often smell worse than the offensive odor, RV detailing is expensive, and shampooing often just spreads the smell around. Many things can cause odors in your RV – pets, smoke, gasoline, smog, mold/mildew, bathroom, and holding tanks all cause odors to build up in your RV.

    Clear The Air Odor Remover Bags can simply be hung in your RV and they will completely eliminate all these odors. Our product draws in odors like a powerful magnet and are also safe around children and pets even if eaten. It does not have to come into contact with odor producer to eliminate the odor – Clear The Air does not cover up odors it literally “clears the air” leaving the air fresh and clean.

    Find out HOW to use our Odor Eliminating Products in your RV by clicking here.