• Tips For Bringing Home A Cute Cuddly Kitten

    Posted on August 2nd, 2013
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    Clear The Air loves cats and we know that sometimes it can take a new kitten time to get used to their new surroundings.

    Check out our tips for bringing home a new kitten:

    • Give your kitten some time – Kittens are sometimes adopted at six weeks of age, but 10 to 12 weeks is better. Those extra weeks spent with his mother and siblings help a kitten learn acceptable behavior, from getting along with siblings to getting used to human contact. If a kitten has been gently handled and has gotten used to humans, he will be friendlier and better adjusted. In choosing a kitten, look for one that is inquisitive, doesn’t shy away from your touch, and is ready to play.
    • Provide a comfortable home for your kitten – Away from his litter mates or mother, the kitten needs to feel secure as well as warm. Whether you provide a cardboard box lined with a blanket or a fancier bed from a pet supply store, keep your kitten’s bed in a quiet place, away from household traffic.
    • Introduce your kitten to the family slowly – Although everyone will want to hold the kitten, limit handling for the first few days while your new pet adjusts. Set up his bed, litter box and food in a quiet room where he can be secured until he gets to know his new home. Introduce one family member at a time, allowing the kitten to come to you and learn your touch. Give your resident cat extra attention to ease his or her anxiety. Once the kitten feels comfortable, allow the two to meet briefly. Stay in the room while they sniff and explore each other.
    • Kitten-proof your home before bringing him home – Kittens can get tangled or choked by anything swinging or hanging. Therefore, keep your new pet safe by securely anchoring drape or blind cords out of reach. To prevent chewing on electric and phone cords, bundle them with a cord manager and fasten away from kittens’ reach. In the laundry area, keep washer and dryer doors closed: A kitten may climb into a warm dryer for a nap. Remember, if something would be harmful for a toddler, it’s the same for your kitten.
  • How To Eliminate Litter Box Odor

    Posted on March 11th, 2013
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    Don’t let your litter box odor bring you down.

    Does your cat’s litter box have an unpleasant odor coming from it? Chances are your cat may not enjoy using his/her sand box because of the strong odor. Clear the Air would like to share with all our cat lovers some tips for keeping your litter box odor free.

    We have provided some helpful cat litter tips:

    Scooping – The number one rule, and the only thing that will keep litter box odor at bay, is constant cleaning. That means scooping the box out at least twice a day, removing the solids and liquid clumps if you use clumping litter.  If you don’t use clumping litter, you can use a large solid metal spoon to lift out the most urine-soaked areas each time you clean and add litter as needed to replace what is removed.

    Washing Your Litter Box – You should also get in the habit of washing the litter box at least every other week if not more.  Use a mild unscented dish detergent and rinse clean.  Remember to clean your scooper too.  When the box is dry, sprinkle a thin layer of our Cat Urine Odor Eliminator in the box first.  Then add two to three inches of litter.  Cats do not like a deep tray of litter and this allows you to add litter as you scoop.

    Type of Litter – Some have perfumes and others have additives to only cover the smell.  To a cat, these smells can be overwhelming and make the box unwelcoming.  It is usually a good idea to get unscented litter and sprinkle our Cat Urine Odor Eliminator in the box to eliminate the odor, not cover it up.

    Type of Litter Box – Using the largest box your home can accommodate is the best idea.  A good rule of thumb is to get a box that is at least twice as long as your adult cat and wide as the cat is long.  Even though a covered box is nicer to look at, most cats don’t like them and they also trap odors inside making it unpleasant for your pet to enter.  Cats claws can get stuck in liners when they are digging for a place to relieve themselves and the urine can also seep into the liner, trapping odors in the box.

    Location – Lastly, location of your cats litter box is very important to keep your pet happy to relieve himself in the correct areas.  The rule is one litter box per cat plus one.  If your cat is on the third floor of your house and the litter box is in the basement, he may not decide to make the long trek.  It is important to have the boxes in different locations.  Also make sure the box is in a low traffic area, away from his or her food and in a place that your cat can easily get in and out of.

    These suggestions may take a lot of effort but not only with your cat be happier but you will as well, not having to put up with cat urine odors.    Remember to pick up Clear the Air’s Cat Urine Odor Eliminator available at all Petco stores or online.

  • Why Is My Cat Peeing In The House?

    Posted on February 18th, 2013
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    Cat urine is one of the most difficult odors to eliminate. If your cat has been going to the bathroom in your house, outside of his litter box, there may be some ways you can fix this problem.

    In order to eliminate the cat urine odor, use our Cat Urine Odor Eliminator product to eliminate the odors.

    Medical Problem: A kidney or bladder infection is the most common cause. Your cat should be checked out by your vet to exclude any medical issues. If your cat’s problem is behavioral, you’ll need to find out why he is misbehaving. Any kind of stress can make your cat stop using his litter box. If you have recently moved, had a new baby or have introduced another pet; all these actions can cause your cat to feel threatened.

    Litter Box: A cat that is unhappy with his box will stop using it. Think about it: would you use a dirty, smelly toilet? Of course not. Cats are very clean animals and some of them are extremely finicky about their litter boxes. The problem could be a different litter, dirty box, location, or sharing with another cat. If you have multiple cats, they each should have their own litter box. A cat that has been declawed will have special needs when it comes to litter. You may need to switch to paper litter that is softer on his delicate paws. Make sure the litter box is cleaned daily. Sometimes all it takes is changing to a new litter, getting a new box or moving the box to another part of the house.

    Behavior Change: Pay extra attention to your cat and praise him often. Remind him that he is loved and an important part of the family. Moving to a new home is a big change in your cat’s life. He could be stressed by the move. He could also be reacting to the scent of a former tenants pet. This will cause your cat to start peeing in a certain spot. To stop this, you need to completely remove the odor so your cat won’t want to leave his scent.

    No More Urination: you must remove the odor from your home. Your cat will keep returning to that area if he can pick up the scent. Urine should be cleaned up as soon as possible. Wipe up the mess with a paper towel and then clean it. Sprinkle Cat Urine Odor Eliminator where your cat went to the bathroom and leave on for 24 hours. You may then vacuum it up. In some cases a second application may be necessary. Remember, our products are 100% non-toxic and safe even if ingested.

  • Caring For Your Cat And Watching For Illness

    Posted on December 13th, 2012
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    Cats are good at hiding how they feel if they are ill and the older a cat gets, the longer it takes for them to recover from an illness.

    It is important to pay attention to your cat as he ages and catch any problems before they become very serious.

    If you are close with your cat, you can usually tell if something is different or not right with him. Don’t discount that feeling that something doesn’t seem right. Because of the love and close relationship you share with your feline, you have an advantage to knowing when something is wrong.

    In fact, change in behavior is the number one way a cat will tell you he’s not feeling right. Changes in behavior can be sudden or may develop over time. When your cat begins to age, it is important to make important enrichment to his nutrition, grooming needs and home life.

    It is a good idea to keep a log of some of your cat’s normal activities. Since changes in your cat’s behavior are the best sign that he isn’t feeling good, knowing what is normal and abnormal for him will help nip a potentially fatal illness in the bud.

    If your cat normally chases after his toys, make a note of that. If he wakes you up every morning then suddenly stops, this could be an indication of arthritis and it may hurt too much to jump on the bed.

    It is also important to note how often your cat eats and drinks. If he always runs to his food bowl when he hears you pour more in and suddenly stops doing this, something may be going on with  him. Keeping note of his appetite, weight, water intake, urination and defecation, skin and fur, respiration and other habits of your cat will let you quickly identify if he isn’t feeling well.

    If you have any concerns your cat may be sick, take him to the vet immediately. If your cat has accidents in the house, use Clear the Air to eliminate cat urine odor.

  • Keep Your Cat’s Litter Box Smelling Its Best

    Posted on December 12th, 2012
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    Do you have a cat? Are you regularly reminded you have one by the way your litter box smells?

    If you are expecting company for the holidays, you will probably want to keep Clear the Air on hand to sprinkle on your cats litter box to make the odor non-existent while making the litter box more appealing for your cat.

    We have provided some helpful cat litter tips:

    Scooping – The number one rule, and the only thing that will keep litter box odor at bay, is constant cleaning. That means scooping the box out at least twice a day, removing the solids and liquid clumps if you use clumping litter.  If you don’t use clumping litter, you can use a large solid metal spoon to lift out the most urine-soaked areas each time you clean and add litter as needed to replace what is removed.

    Washing Your Litter Box – You should also get in the habit of washing the litter box at least every other week if not more.  Use a mild unscented dish detergent and rinse clean.  Remember to clean your scooper too.  When the box is dry, sprinkle a thin layer of our Cat Urine Odor Eliminator in the box first.  Then add two to three inches of litter.  Cats do not like a deep tray of litter and this allows you to add litter as you scoop.

    Type of Litter – Some have perfumes and others have additives to only cover the smell.  To a cat, these smells can be overwhelming and make the box unwelcoming.  It is usually a good idea to get unscented litter and sprinkle our Cat Urine Odor Eliminator in the box to eliminate the odor, not cover it up.

    Type of Litter Box – Using the largest box your home can accommodate is the best idea.  A good rule of thumb is to get a box that is at least twice as long as your adult cat and wide as the cat is long.  Even though a covered box is nicer to look at, most cats don’t like them and they also trap odors inside making it unpleasant for your pet to enter.  Cats claws can get stuck in liners when they are digging for a place to relieve themselves and the urine can also seep into the liner, trapping odors in the box.

    Location – Lastly, location of your cats litter box is very important to keep your pet happy to relieve himself in the correct areas.  The rule is one litter box per cat plus one.  If your cat is on the third floor of your house and the litter box is in the basement, he may not decide to make the long trek.  It is important to have the boxes in different locations.  Also make sure the box is in a low traffic area, away from his or her food and in a place that your cat can easily get in and out of.

    These suggestions may take a lot of effort but not only with your cat be happier but you will as well, not having to put up with cat urine odors.    Remember to pick up Clear the Air’s Cat Urine Odor Eliminator available at all Petco stores or online.

  • Hastings Needs A Home!

    Posted on December 5th, 2012
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    Clear the Air always likes to feature pets in the spotlight at the San Diego Humane Society. Hastings is a recent employee favorite and in need of his forever home.

    “Hastings is very loving and loves to snuggle in your lap or next to you,” says Kelly R., Chief Financial Officer of the San Diego Humane Society and SPCA. Kelly chose Hastings as her Employee Pick because of his winning personality and adorable little idiosyncracies that were quick to steal her heart, like the squeaky little chirping sounds that he makes when he is ready to play or have dinner.

    Hastings is a Hidden Gem, which means that he tends to do better in an environment outside of the public adoption area. He is currently being housed in the Finance Department; and Kelly, along with the rest of the Finance team, couldn’t be happier about it! They are constantly taking photos of the sweet kitty playing peek-a-boo, or curled up in a ball, or just looking as handsome as ever. Adding to his handsomeness, says Kelly, is his “…beautiful soft coat and sparkly white belly fur.

    He also has the cutest freckles on his nose!” We asked Kelly if there was anything else that makes her Pick awesome and she was quick to tell us, “Hastings is enough company to be the only kitty in the family, which will suit him just fine. He is all you would want in a cat and more! And maybe best of all, he has a TERRIFIC purr motor!!”

    If you are interested in meeting Hastings, or in getting some more info about him, please call the San Diego Humane Society at (619) 299-7012.

  • Two Pets Find A Home During Hurricane Sandy

    Posted on November 16th, 2012
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    The ASPCA recently reported a great story about two lucky pets who found homes during the torrential torment of Hurricane Sandy.

    Clear the Air is happy to report this great story:

    As Hurricane Sandy made landfall in the Tri-State region, ASPCA employees worked tirelessly around the clock to provide critical care to animals in need, including the animals in our Adoption Center in Manhattan.

    We are thrilled to report that two lucky animals found loving forever homes in the midst of the chaos caused by this historic storm.

    First, a very special Chihuahua named Bentley—later changed to “Sandy” in honor of the occasion of his adoption—went home with Katherine N. on Monday to join his new family.

    This sweet dog has come a long way. When he first arrived at the ASPCA in July, Sandy suffered from severe pneumonia and a broken leg. His pneumonia prevented him from undergoing immediate surgery and as a result, he lost his leg. Sandy took this in stride, happily moving around on three legs.

    Katherine was drawn to Sandy while volunteering as a dog walker at the Adoption Center—his sweet personality and love for sitting in laps was irresistible. She has re-named him “Tito,” and calls him a “hurricane miracle.” He is safe and sound in Katherine’s home, making friends with her other dog, Nina, whom she rescued from the ASPCA in 2005.

    On Tuesday, a sweet 12-week-old kitten named Nelly also received his happy ending. With a day off from work due to Hurricane Sandy, Christie H. and Mark G. visited our Adoption Center and adopted Nelly to join their cat, an ASPCA rescue named Ted, in their New York City home. Now Nelly is “Ned,” and Ned and Ted are getting along great.

    We couldn’t be happier that these two shelter pets found loving families, who were willing to welcome shelter pets into their homes during an unsettling time.

    Story can be found at: http://blog.aspca.org/content/two-lucky-pets-find-homes-during-hurricane-sandy

  • Benefits Of Owning A Cat Or Dog

    Posted on November 13th, 2012
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    Pet ownership has many benefits.

    We had posted this blog article a few months back but thought it was interesting some of the benefits of having a dog or cat.  Not that us here at Clear the Air need reasons to have our cats or dogs, for those that wonder why us animal lovers are so crazed over their pets, check out these benefits of having a pet.

    There are many benefits of having a pet.  Not only are they entertaining and provide unconditional love, but you your health can also be benefited by having a pet.

    Pets can help decrease stress. In a 2002 study at State University of New York at Buffalo, researchers found that when conducting a stressful task, people experienced less stress when their pets were with them than when a spouse, family member or close friend was nearby.

    Lower Blood Pressure.  While some studies have found a stronger connection than others, having a pet has the potential to lower blood pressure, especially in hypertensive or high-risk patients, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

    Eases pain. Believe it or not, pets can be the best medicine, especially when a person is dealing with chronic pain such as migraines or arthritis.  One study from Loyola University found that people who use pet therapy while recovering from surgery may need significantly less pain medication than those who do not.

    Improves mood. A lot of the health benefits of owning a pet may stem from the mental and emotional benefits.  They give you a sense of belonging and feeling of being needed, while stroking and handling animals can be incredibly therapeutic for those who are stressed.

    Pets help children develop.  Children who grow up in a household with pets benefit in countless ways, especially in their emotional development.  Pets are also hugely beneficial to children suffering from autism and Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD). For children with ADHD, taking care of a pet can encourage them to focus on responsibilities through a predictable routine.

    Monitors Blood Sugar Levels for Diabetics.  According to the American Diabetes Association’s Diabetes Forecast magazine, a 1992 study found that one-third of the pets living with diabetics (mostly dogs, but other pets included cats, birds and rabbits) would change their behavior when their owner’s blood sugar level dropped.

    Prevents Strokes. Although dogs are often touted for their health benefits, cat owners can see gains, too. Felines are just as beneficial to your health as dogs.  If you have a cat,  you are less likely to have a heart attack and even increasingly less likely to have a cardiovascular incident like a stroke.

  • A Cat’s Visit To The Vet – Not The Car!!!

    Posted on September 27th, 2012
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    There are very few cats that actually don’t mind or even enjoy having to ride in the car. Clear the Air would like to share some car ride tips for your cat.

    The most common car trip is usually to the vet, and that event causes enough anxiety by itself. Getting stressed out by the car ride to the vet may make it difficult to tell what is “normal” and what is stress-related on the physical exam for some cats. Here are some tips to reduce travel stress to the vet’s office and beyond.

    Cat Transportation
    For the safety of the driver and the cat, carriers should always be used for transporting cats (dogs too). Cats can startle easily, jump out of the smallest opening or basically interfere with the driver’s duties when they are stressed. The carrier should be cleansed after each use with a non-toxic soap or cleanser.

    The Carrier
    Letting your cat explore the cat carrier at their own pace and without any pending trip is always a good idea. Offering a treat or small amount of food in this non-stressed situation may incite some curiosity and comfort, too.

    Short Trips
    While it may be considered a hassle to take your cat for a quick ride to the post office or bank, short trips of no consequence (i.e. a vet visit) may help reduce car anxiety and build confidence in your cat with each car ride. It is important to stress the need for short trips so your cat will not be left alone in warm weather, where heatstroke in hot cars poses serious risk.

    Weight Check at the Vet’s Office
    Most veterinary offices are happy to do a quick weigh-in. Be sure to call ahead to check office hours and avoid busy times. The receptionist should be able to recommend a best day and time for a weigh-in.

    Your cat may be weighed alone on the scale or in the carrier on the scale (subtracting the weight of the carrier) to become familiar with the veterinary office. A one-pound gain or loss in an average 10-pound cat represents 10% of their body weight, so tracking weight is always a healthy idea.

    Creative Scheduling
    Speak to your veterinarian about scheduling your cat’s appointment during quieter times of the day. Some veterinarians have cat-only entrances and waiting rooms which also help to keep cats calm.Feline Only Practices
    Some veterinarians specialize in feline medicine and their practice is limited to cats only. This is a great option for cats who are OK with the car ride but get stressed out by the dogs and noise of a mixed practice.

    House Call Veterinarian
    If the thought of going to the vet stresses you and your cat out, consider utilizing a mobile veterinarian. Ask your vet if they do any house calls, and if not, if they can recommend a house call vet in your area. Friends, family, groomers and boarding kennels may also know of someone to recommend.Sedation Medication
    If your cat is one that will not be calmed in the car or at the veterinary office, please speak to your veterinarian about the possibility of giving a light sedation at home prior to the trip. This may maximize the veterinary exam effectiveness while reducing your cat’s stress.

  • Is Your Cat Sick? Signs To Look For

    Posted on September 11th, 2012
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    We all want the best for our beloved pets and keeping an eye on changes in your cat can help detect any changes in health early enough before they become fatal or an expensive trip to the vet.

    Check out the following signs your cat may not be feeling his best:

    The Fur – Cats are extremely clean creatures with very good personal hygiene habits; they will almost always take care of their own grooming. A healthy cat’s fur should be soft, clean and have a slightly glossy appearance. If you see any visible changes in the condition of your cat’s coat, the fur becomes dry, matted, dull or almost greasy, this could be a sign your cat is not well. A cat that suddenly stops preening is almost certainly not well. On the other hand, a cat who ‘over grooms’ so that the skin looks sore and red and missing patches of fur could be a sign of stress, a flea infestation, allergy or a skin condition.

    Changes To The Cat’s Eyes – Cat’s eyes are extremely striking to look at and they all vary from cat to cat. They can have small, vertically slit pupils, the spindle-shaped cat’s eye or naturally dilated looking pupils. A cat may have different colored eyes. If a cat is unwell, the eyes will show it. If your cat’s pupils seem to change size, either both of them or just in one eye this can spell out trouble in the cat’s nervous system. Pupils with a milky or even filmy look may indicate vision problems.

    Ears – Like the coat, a cat will do a good job at maintaining the cleanliness of his ears. With the exception of a bit of ear wax, the ears should usually be fairly clean. If on inspection of your cat’s ears you notice any redness, swelling or a bluish or yellow tinge inside the ears, contact your vet. Same goes for excessively itchy ears, if your cat can not stop scratching his ears it may be ear mites. A cat’s ears are particularly sensitive in extreme temperatures, due to lack of blood flow in the area, your cat could get frostbite on the tips of its ears so keep a close watch on your cat’s ears in winter.

    Appetite – Keeping a close eye on your cat’s eating habits can determine its overall health. If your cat has always been a vicarious eater and suddenly shows no interest in food or eats very half heatedly he may not be 100%. But if your cat stops eating all together or struggles to keep food down, this is a serious sign and should be investigated by a vet.

    Mouth, Teeth And Gums – If you’ve ever tried to open your cat’s mouth you’ll know it can be somewhat of a challenge, but your cat’s mouth and gums are very strong indicators of illness. The color of the skin inside the mouth should have a pink tinge off of it, skin that is white or yellow toned could be a sign of anemia or liver damage. Skin that shows a slight blue tinge is a cause of concern as this could show poisoning or a respiratory problem. However, some changes to the mouth and gums are normal, the cat’s mouth may take on the same color as its coat this is generally normal as the cat gets older but should be checked out by a vet. Teeth should be inspected from time to time, tartar build up can not only cause bad breath but can cause infections that can enter the cat’s bloodstream and end up infecting his organs.